Conservation Alerts

Fletcher's Boathouse river access at risk

Updated 12/15/14: The National Park Service (NPS), Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park, is hosting a public meeting regarding Fletchers Cove river access, Wednesday, December 17, 2014 from 6:30 PM to 8:00 PM at the NPS National Capital Region Headquarters located at 1100 Ohio Drive, SW, Washington, DC, 20242. The meeting will address both interim and long term proposals. Club leadership will be represented; members are urged to attend.

In October 2014 an official with the National Park Service declared the walkway to the Fletcher’s Cove boat dock unsafe for public use, effectively cutting off access to the Potomac river from publicly available row boats, canoes and kayaks. The walkway, which once floated at the lowest tide, is now grounded and compromised by siltation. Unless immediate action is taken, there is a strong possibility the dock will stay closed next spring. The continued operations of the Fletcher’s Cove concession as we now know it may be at risk. To ensure continued access to the dock in the spring of 2015, ACTION MUST BE TAKEN NOW. Please click on this link for instructions on how to express your concerns and spur action.


Act today to help fight algae in the Shenandoah!

A personal appeal from Jeff Kelble, President and Shenandoah Riverkeeper, Potomac Riverkeeper Inc.:
Are you tired of the algae in the Shenandoah River? I know I am, and I need your help doing something about it. On August 5th, 2014 Shenandoah Riverkeeper initiated a legal challenge (litigation) against the United States Environmental Protection Agency to compel them to do something about our algae problems.

Click here to download a sample letter and instructions for getting your voice heard in support of this important effort. Read the press release, then follow links to the right of the release.

Click here to view e-mail from Jeff and forward link to your friends and family.

2014 State of the Nation's River Report: River Friendly Growth

Potomac Conservancy's 2014 State of the Nation's River report calls for urgent action to preserve local water quality in the face of rapid urbanization. The report takes a close look at emerging threats to the Potomac and offers common sense solutions for clean water. Download the report. 

New USGS Research

Fsh exposed to estrogenic endocrine-disrupting chemicals may have increased susceptibility to infectious disease. Read the Technical Announcement...

Jeff Kelble named president of Potomac Riverkeeper, Inc.

Read the news release...

 

Fishing Contest

Click to read the rules

2014 Results

Section 1, Biggest Fish: George Moran, 20.5"
Section 1, Best 5 Fish: Dave Lockard - 84"
Section 2, Biggest Fish: Bill Pearl - 19"
Section 2, Best 5 Fish: Bill Pearl - 84.5"
Section 3, Biggest Fish: Wayne Tate - 20"
Section 3, Best 5 Fish: Bill Pearl - 84"
Largest on Fly: Wayne Tate - 20"
Best 5 fish on Fly: Randy Chandler - 75"
Largest by New Member: John Aucella - 19"
William Shriver Award: Bill Pearl - 176.5"
Grover Cleveland Award: George Moran - 20.5"

Interested in Speaking at a PRSC Meeting?

Contact our program chair at: programs@prsc.org.

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Next Meeting

When: 3/25/2015 @ 7:30 PM
Program: Matt Miles
Location: Vienna Fire Station, 400 Center St. South, Vienna, VA
Doors open at 7:00

Useful Links

Now in our 27th year!

Founded in 1988 and now in its 27th year, the Potomac River Smallmouth Club (PRSC) is the Washington D.C. area's leading river fishing and conservation organization. We promote catch and release angling for smallmouth bass, support conservation organizations and agencies, publish a monthly newsletter, present monthly programs with guest speakers, and organize river trips for our members.  ...more 

Matt Miles is our March speaker

March 25th

By Bill Amshey, PRSC Program Chair
Matt Miles of Matt Miles Fly Fishing will speak at our March 25th meeting. His topic will be fishing the rivers on which he guides in Central and Western Virginia. Matt's passion is fly fishing, guiding, teaching, and being on the water. He also ties his own flies and is a fly designer for Umpqua Feather Merchants. 
To understand Matt, all you have to know is his business slogan: The Tug Is the Drug! How can any fisherman disagree with that? He grew up in Lynchburg, Virginia, and started fly fishing in 1993. In 1996, after graduating from high school, he moved to Colorado to live out his dream of becoming a fly fishing guide.  While in Colorado, he met Pat Dorsey, an expert fly fishing guide for the Blue Quill Angler, author, and photographer. In 1997 Matt started guiding with Pat at the Blue Quill Angler in Evergreen, Colorado, where he guided over 700 trips fishing exclusively for the various types of trout in Colorado. In 2003, Matt decided to return to Lynchburg to guide his home waters.
Most of the flies Matt has designed for Umpqua are trout flies. His favorite smallmouth flies are a black Sneaky Pete’s or a chartreuse Sneaky Pete’s for topwater. He uses various white baitfish patterns for streamers like the CK Baitfish, Murdich’s Minnow, and Todd’s Wiggle Minnow.  He also likes Clawdads in brown or black and blue.
Matt offers guided trips to many public water destinations in Central and Western Virginia.  The variety of water he guides allows him to put fishermen on the hottest action in Virginia.
Most of Matt's guiding is done out of a Boulder Boat Works drift boat, but he also guides wade trips fishing for trout.  Trips are run on the New, Jackson, Roanoke/Staunton, Maury, and James Rivers.  Matt guides for trout, smallmouth bass, musky, and freshwater stripers. Fly fishing is Matt’s passion, and he is comfortable guiding all levels of fisherman, from beginner to expert level. Seeing his clients learn new techniques or experiencing catching a new species on a fly gratifies him and reconfirms his love for the sport.
For more information on Matt Miles’ Fly Fishing, check out his Website at www.mattmilesflyfishing.com.  Or you can contact him at 434-238-2720 or matt@mattmilesflyfishing.com.
We hope you can make the March meeting, which promises to reveal some secrets of rivers not many club members get to explore.